Case Studies / Health & Education

How Curve Communications Works with Health and Education Clients

Health and education brands share one common trait: they sell essential services. For this reason, emotion plays a crucial role in prospective client/patient decision-making. Choosing a school for a child with learning disabilities, a doctor to perform surgery or an orthodontist to straighten teeth are deeply personal decisions.

Because of the nature of their industries, health and education businesses often come to Curve Communications with major marketing hurdles – including difficulties explaining complicated services to potential students or patients, challenges carving out value propositions, roadblocks to reaching target audiences, trouble choosing marketing tools and even combating negative stereotypes.

Curve has worked with schools, rehabilitation centres, dentists, orthodontists, naturopaths and specialty healthcare businesses for years. We know that these clients require hyper-individualized marketing approaches to establish trust with target audiences. That’s why a whole division of our agency focuses specifically on the needs of health and education businesses.

“Selling a pair of shoes is not the same as selling a specialized education program for kids with learning disabilities,” said Amanda Bates, Curve’s vice president.  “We understand that marketing essential services requires a very different approach to marketing products.”

Marketing Roadblocks

Parents do a lot of research before making decisions about what is best for their children. So private and special needs schools have their work cut out for them when it comes to lead conversion. No education brand understands this better than Eaton Arrowsmith School (EA).

EA is a school for children with learning disabilities. It does not provide tools to help kids cope with their challenges. Instead, it uses a unique series of cognitive exercises to strengthen students’ brains to make learning easier. The school’s program is based on the science of neuroplasticity – the belief that the brain can change and make new connections over time with the help of targeted exercises.

Eaton Arrowsmith approached Curve for marketing help in 2014. At the time, the school wanted to attract more local students, but also needed to make its brand more consistent and clear for parents of prospective students.

The educational experience EA sells is complicated. And while it’s backed by research and ongoing studies, there is still some pushback from the medical and learning disabilities communities about the effectiveness of the program. However, countless testimonials from former students paint a very positive story about progress for kids who struggle with learning challenges.

“We really appreciate having a team of marketing experts on our side,” Heusel said. “Curve is truly part of the EA team – helping connect our schools with students who can benefit from our unique programs.”

In addition to offering a unique program, EA also has several schools under the Eaton Arrowsmith umbrella. When EA’s admissions and marketing director first approached Curve, this included three EA locations, Eaton Arrowsmith Academy, five locations of the Eaton Cognitive Improvement Centre (ECIC – now called Eaton Arrowsmith Adults), and Magnussen School. That’s four programs, 10 schools/locations, five separate websites and several social media accounts.

“Eaton Arrowsmith was suffering from a case of brand confusion,” said Amanda Bates, Vice President of Curve. “The websites and messaging just didn’t tell the EA story in an understandable and relatable way.”

As a result, prospective parents were confused about the programs, how they related to each other and which ones could be right for their kids. Eaton Arrowsmith’s marketing tools were doing the opposite of what they were supposed to: they were acting as a wall instead of a door into the brand.

But the admissions and marketing director was busy fielding inquiries, connecting with current parents and students, attending meetings, allocating ad spends, running social media, managing school events and much more. She didn’t have time to solve EA’s marketing problems or strategize about future needs. Her focus was on the day-to-day needs of several busy schools and their students.

“Eaton Arrowsmith grew from one school in 2005 to four schools and more than eight programs by 2014,” said Sandra Heusel, Eaton Arrowsmith’s admissions and marketing director. “As we grew, it became challenging to refine and focus our messaging.”

Finding Brand Clarity​

The first thing Curve did when we started working with Eaton Arrowsmith was to learn every detail about the schools and the programs they offer so we could put ourselves in the shoes of the target audience. If we didn’t understand the schools’ service offerings, parents who were looking at EA’s website wouldn’t understand them either. Our next step was to amalgamate all of the existing websites into one site, rewrite the content, redesign creative and take new photos. The site layout was extremely important. A person who visited eatonarrowsmith.com needed to be able to quickly figure out which education stream was right for them and navigate to the relevant information.

The website copy underwent 40 revisions and was 60 pages long when complete. The home page was carefully designed to outline the different programs and included buttons for each of the schools, with details specifying age and locations. That way prospective students and their parents could easily find information relevant to them without having to sift through too much content.

Eaton Arrowsmith’s target audience is parents who are stressed about their child’s struggles in school and have explored many options, but feel like nothing has helped. They desperately want to find a solution so their child doesn’t have to spend all of his or her time completing homework and studying for tests. Because of the emotion factor, we wanted site users to feel like EA could be the answer to their child’s learning difficulties. But we also didn’t want to add stress to parents’ lives by overwhelming them with information.

We saw great results immediately following the launch of the website in August 2015. There was a 60 per cent increase in the amount of people visiting the site. Visitors also stayed on the site for an average of three minutes and 19 seconds – well above the two-minute industry standard. Page views also improved by 70 per cent, which indicated that the new site structure was directing people to subpages where they could find additional information.

Brand Build for Success​

Curve has now worked with Eaton Arrowsmith for several years. In addition to building the new website, we revised the existing school logos to make them modern and consistent.

As part of our ongoing relationship with EA, we’ve also written advertorials and blog posts, interviewed current and past students for testimonials, managed ad buys, designed brochures and flyers, created and managed social media ads, and developed marketing strategies to promote school tours and generate awareness about Eaton Arrowsmith

We really appreciate having a team of marketing experts on our side,” Heusel said. “Curve is truly part of the EA team – helping connect our schools with students who can benefit from our unique programs.”

With new brand messaging, an optimized website, and consistent creative collateral, Curve has generated more than 700 international leads to boost enrolment in Eaton Arrowsmith’s programs.

In Depth Client Knowledge

Our relationship with EA led us to a rehabilitation and education business called the Watson Centre Society for Brain Health. Founded by Howard Eaton, EA’s founder and director, along with Mark Watson, EA’s former CEO, the Watson Centre uses the Arrowsmith Program to help people who have suffered acquired and traumatic brain injuries. Watson’s founders approached Curve because they had worked with our team through Eaton Arrowsmith and needed help launching the business. Curve built a website for Watson that simply and accurately explains what the centre can do for individuals with brain injuries.

“The Watson Centre Society for Brain Health is the only brain injury rehabilitation program of its kind,” said Mark Watson, the centre’s co-director. “We chose to work with Curve because of the team’s understanding of the Arrowsmith Program and how it can help individuals strengthen connections in their brains.”

Similar to Eaton Arrowsmith, the decision to attend a brain injury rehabilitation centre is extremely personal. Many of Watson’s potential clients are people who have tried other rehabilitation methods, but feel like their recovery has stalled and so are looking for solutions. Curve designed the Watson website with clients’ emotions in mind. The site is welcoming, clearly explains the program, and offers testimonials from people who are attending or who have completed their time at Watson.

Curve now runs Facebook ads to drive traffic to Watson’s website and to encourage enrolment. These ads target individuals who live in and around Vancouver and explain how a brain injury doesn’t have to be a life sentence. This approach is very appealing to Watson’s target audience of people who are seeking help after they feel like they can’t make any more progress.

“The first thing Curve did when we started working with Eaton Arrowsmith was to learn every detail about the schools and the programs they offer so we could put ourselves in the shoes of the target audience.”

Marketing Non-traditional Medical

While many healthcare brands sell traditional services – like dentistry, orthodontics and optometry – others sell alternative medical services. These health businesses face many similar challenges to private schools that offer specialty programs. As a result, they require clear branding and messaging to explain their services to potential clients.

The IV Wellness Boutique in Yaletown is one of these companies. It’s a full-service wellness boutique that specializes in IV vitamin therapy. The IV sells drips that deliver high doses of vitamins to help with everything from stress and anxiety to hangovers, jet lag, colds and even weight loss. In addition to IVs, the boutique offers naturopathic medicine, medical aesthetics, acupuncture, osteopathy, and diagnostic testing. It also has a natural dispensary – selling a variety of products to meet clients’ health needs.

The IV Wellness Boutique was the first wellness clinic in Vancouver to specialize in intravenous vitamin therapy. So when it first opened in the city, it faced some skepticism. The IV originally hired Curve for a three-month contract to launch the boutique in Yaletown and provide media training to combat any negative PR. We provided the owners with media training to help them handle criticism from the public and the media. Because of our help, the owners had the confidence to handle inflammatory statements about intravenous vitamin therapy and the IV didn’t fall prey to negative publicity.

“When it comes to launching a new brand or service, owners have to be prepared for anything,” Bates said. “A business can shut down negativity pretty quickly with the right training and tools.”

Curve successfully launched the IV in Vancouver and secured media hits with major networks like CTV’s the National, CTV Vancouver, Global BC, as well as newspapers like Metro-National, The Province, Daily Hive, the Vancouver Courier and the Westender. We even got Jillian Harris – from Love it or List it Vancouver, the Bachelor and the Bachelorette – to come into the IV for a drip.

The IV Wellness Boutique got a major surge in clients from our work, so the owners hired us back after our contract ended to launch the IV to Go – a new branch of the business offering mobile wellness therapy out of an ambulance.

The IV wanted to brand the service as Vancouver’s first mobile therapy lounge, offering IV vitamin treatments to clients wherever they may be. To accomplish this, Curve developed the “We drive…you drip” slogan and designed the wrap for the ambulance, as well as mobile menus and collateral for various events. To emphasize the fact that the IV Wellness Boutique can provide clients with treatments pretty much anywhere, our team came up with the idea of doing a photoshoot in the middle of the forest. We shot some photos of people getting IVs in Lynn Canyon with the IV Wellness ambulance in the background. The company continues to use these photos in marketing efforts.

“Sometimes you have to think outside the box and get creative when you’re selling unique health-related services,” Bates said. “Our approach to launching the IV Wellness Boutique and the IV to Go helped this retail health business gain a strong following in Vancouver.”

Marketing Roadblocks​

Parents do a lot of research before making decisions about what is best for their children. So private and special needs schools have their work cut out for them when it comes to lead conversion. No education brand understands this better than Eaton Arrowsmith School (EA).

EA is a school for children with learning disabilities. It does not provide tools to help kids cope with their challenges. Instead, it uses a unique series of cognitive exercises to strengthen students’ brains to make learning easier. The school’s program is based on the science of neuroplasticity – the belief that the brain can change and make new connections over time with the help of targeted exercises.

Eaton Arrowsmith approached Curve for marketing help in 2014. At the time, the school wanted to attract more local students, but also needed to make its brand more consistent and clear for parents of prospective students.

The educational experience EA sells is complicated. And while it’s backed by research and ongoing studies, there is still some pushback from the medical and learning disabilities communities about the effectiveness of the program. However, countless testimonials from former students paint a very positive story about progress for kids who struggle with learning challenges.

We really appreciate having a team of marketing experts on our side,” Heusel said. “Curve is truly part of the EA team – helping connect our schools with students who can benefit from our unique programs.”

In addition to offering a unique program, EA also has several schools under the Eaton Arrowsmith umbrella. When EA’s admissions and marketing director first approached Curve, this included three EA locations, Eaton Arrowsmith Academy, five locations of the Eaton Cognitive Improvement Centre (ECIC – now called Eaton Arrowsmith Adults), and Magnussen School. That’s four programs, 10 schools/locations, five separate websites and several social media accounts.

“Eaton Arrowsmith was suffering from a case of brand confusion,” said Amanda Bates, Vice President of Curve. “The websites and messaging just didn’t tell the EA story in an understandable and relatable way.”

As a result, prospective parents were confused about the programs, how they related to each other and which ones could be right for their kids. Eaton Arrowsmith’s marketing tools were doing the opposite of what they were supposed to: they were acting as a wall instead of a door into the brand.

But the admissions and marketing director was busy fielding inquiries, connecting with current parents and students, attending meetings, allocating ad spends, running social media, managing school events and much more. She didn’t have time to solve EA’s marketing problems or strategize about future needs. Her focus was on the day-to-day needs of several busy schools and their students.

Eaton Arrowsmith grew from one school in 2005 to four schools and more than eight programs by 2014,” said Sandra Heusel, Eaton Arrowsmith’s admissions and marketing director. “As we grew, it became challenging to refine and focus our messaging.”

Finding Brand Clarity​

The first thing Curve did when we started working with Eaton Arrowsmith was to learn every detail about the schools and the programs they offer so we could put ourselves in the shoes of the target audience. If we didn’t understand the schools’ service offerings, parents who were looking at EA’s website wouldn’t understand them either. Our next step was to amalgamate all of the existing websites into one site, rewrite the content, redesign creative and take new photos. The site layout was extremely important. A person who visited eatonarrowsmith.com needed to be able to quickly figure out which education stream was right for them and navigate to the relevant information.

The website copy underwent 40 revisions and was 60 pages long when complete. The home page was carefully designed to outline the different programs and included buttons for each of the schools, with details specifying age and locations. That way prospective students and their parents could easily find information relevant to them without having to sift through too much content.

Eaton Arrowsmith’s target audience is parents who are stressed about their child’s struggles in school and have explored many options, but feel like nothing has helped. They desperately want to find a solution so their child doesn’t have to spend all of his or her time completing homework and studying for tests. Because of the emotion factor, we wanted site users to feel like EA could be the answer to their child’s learning difficulties. But we also didn’t want to add stress to parents’ lives by overwhelming them with information.

We saw great results immediately following the launch of the website in August 2015. There was a 60 per cent increase in the amount of people visiting the site. Visitors also stayed on the site for an average of three minutes and 19 seconds – well above the two-minute industry standard. Page views also improved by 70 per cent, which indicated that the new site structure was directing people to subpages where they could find additional information.

Brand BuilT for Success

Curve has now worked with Eaton Arrowsmith for several years. In addition to building the new website, we revised the existing school logos to make them modern and consistent.

As part of our ongoing relationship with EA, we’ve also written advertorials and blog posts, interviewed current and past students for testimonials, managed ad buys, designed brochures and flyers, created and managed social media ads, and developed marketing strategies to promote school tours and generate awareness about Eaton Arrowsmith

“We really appreciate having a team of marketing experts on our side,” Heusel said. “Curve is truly part of the EA team – helping connect our schools with students who can benefit from our unique programs.”

With new brand messaging, an optimized website, and consistent creative collateral, Curve has generated more than 700 international leads to boost enrolment in Eaton Arrowsmith’s programs.

In Depth Client Knowledge

Our relationship with EA led us to a rehabilitation and education business called the Watson Centre Society for Brain Health. Founded by Howard Eaton, EA’s founder and director, along with Mark Watson, EA’s former CEO, the Watson Centre uses the Arrowsmith Program to help people who have suffered acquired and traumatic brain injuries. Watson’s founders approached Curve because they had worked with our team through Eaton Arrowsmith and needed help launching the business. Curve built a website for Watson that simply and accurately explains what the centre can do for individuals with brain injuries.

“The Watson Centre Society for Brain Health is the only brain injury rehabilitation program of its kind,” said Mark Watson, the centre’s co-director. “We chose to work with Curve because of the team’s understanding of the Arrowsmith Program and how it can help individuals strengthen connections in their brains.”

Similar to Eaton Arrowsmith, the decision to attend a brain injury rehabilitation centre is extremely personal. Many of Watson’s potential clients are people who have tried other rehabilitation methods, but feel like their recovery has stalled and so are looking for solutions. Curve designed the Watson website with clients’ emotions in mind. The site is welcoming, clearly explains the program, and offers testimonials from people who are attending or who have completed their time at Watson.

Curve now runs Facebook ads to drive traffic to Watson’s website and to encourage enrolment. These ads target individuals who live in and around Vancouver and explain how a brain injury doesn’t have to be a life sentence. This approach is very appealing to Watson’s target audience of people who are seeking help after they feel like they can’t make any more progress.

The first thing Curve did when we started working with Eaton Arrowsmith was to learn every detail about the schools and the programs they offer so we could put ourselves in the shoes of the target audience.”

Marketing Non-traditional Medical

While many healthcare brands sell traditional services – like dentistry, orthodontics and optometry – others sell alternative medical services. These health businesses face many similar challenges to private schools that offer specialty programs. As a result, they require clear branding and messaging to explain their services to potential clients.

The IV Wellness Boutique in Yaletown is one of these companies. It’s a full-service wellness boutique that specializes in IV vitamin therapy. The IV sells drips that deliver high doses of vitamins to help with everything from stress and anxiety to hangovers, jet lag, colds and even weight loss. In addition to IVs, the boutique offers naturopathic medicine, medical aesthetics, acupuncture, osteopathy, and diagnostic testing. It also has a natural dispensary – selling a variety of products to meet clients’ health needs.

The IV Wellness Boutique was the first wellness clinic in Vancouver to specialize in intravenous vitamin therapy. So when it first opened in the city, it faced some skepticism. The IV originally hired Curve for a three-month contract to launch the boutique in Yaletown and provide media training to combat any negative PR. We provided the owners with media training to help them handle criticism from the public and the media. Because of our help, the owners had the confidence to handle inflammatory statements about intravenous vitamin therapy and the IV didn’t fall prey to negative publicity.

“When it comes to launching a new brand or service, owners have to be prepared for anything,” Bates said. “A business can shut down negativity pretty quickly with the right training and tools.”

 

Curve successfully launched the IV in Vancouver and secured media hits with major networks like CTV’s the National, CTV Vancouver, Global BC, as well as newspapers like Metro-National, The Province, Daily Hive, the Vancouver Courier and the Westender. We even got Jillian Harris – from Love it or List it Vancouver, the Bachelor and the Bachelorette – to come into the IV for a drip.

The IV Wellness Boutique got a major surge in clients from our work, so the owners hired us back after our contract ended to launch the IV to Go – a new branch of the business offering mobile wellness therapy out of an ambulance.

The IV wanted to brand the service as Vancouver’s first mobile therapy lounge, offering IV vitamin treatments to clients wherever they may be. To accomplish this, Curve developed the “We drive…you drip” slogan and designed the wrap for the ambulance, as well as mobile menus and collateral for various events. To emphasize the fact that the IV Wellness Boutique can provide clients with treatments pretty much anywhere, our team came up with the idea of doing a photoshoot in the middle of the forest. We shot some photos of people getting IVs in Lynn Canyon with the IV Wellness ambulance in the background. The company continues to use these photos in marketing efforts.

“Sometimes you have to think outside the box and get creative when you’re selling unique health-related services,” Bates said. “Our approach to launching the IV Wellness Boutique and the IV to Go helped this retail health business gain a strong following in Vancouver.”